David and Matthew Yap

September 19, 2012 | Tags:

David Y. C. Yap

PERSONAL INFORMATION

Address: Kealakekua, Hawaii

Date of Birth: August 18, 1987

School: Konawaena High School, Grade 11

3.162 GPA

HUNTING INFORMATION

Experience

– Began hunting at age 4

– Hunted in New Zealand, Australia, Namibia, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Argentina, United States, Canada (David had hunted four continents by age 13)

– Harvested Cape buffalo at age 8

– Harvested leopard and elephant at age 11

– Harvested lion and white rhino at age 12

– Achieved recognition as youngest SCI member to achieve the Africa Big Five and Grand Slam of Dangerous Game of Africa Award at age 12 (prior to his brother achieving recognition at age 10)

– Interested in all types of firearms. Shoots rifle, shotgun, pistol and muzzleloader. Reloads his own bullets. Competent in skinning and butchering

– Held a State of Hawaii guide license since age 10

– Featured on 9 ESPN TV shows in Africa and Australia

– Featured on Men’s channel, Outdoor channel and Outdoor Life channel

– Featured on a broadcast quality video by SAFARI VIDEO depicting what it is like for a young hunter to go on his first safari, and the role hunting plays in conservation

– Produced 2 DVDs on hunting in Africa and Hawaii

– Harvested over 80 different animal species

Awards

– 2002 Safari Club International Young Hunter

– SCI World Hunting Awards Program

– Africa Big Five Slam

– Grand Slam of Dangerous Game of Africa

– First Pinnacle of Achievement

– Introduced Trophy Animals of North America – Copper Level

-Global Hunting Award – Bronze Level

– Gazelles of the World – Bronze Level

– Pigs and Peccaries of the World – Silver Level

– Spiral Horned Antelopes of Africa – Copper Level

– Trophy Animals of South America – Copper Level

– Hunting Achievement Award – Copper Level

-Wild Oxen of the World – Bronze Level

– Wild Sheep of the World – Copper Level

– Pygmy Antelope of Africa – Copper Level

– Trophy Animals of Africa – Copper Level

– Trophy Animals of the South Pacific-Diamond Level

– Top Ten Award-Copper Level

CONTRIBUTIONS TO CONSERVATION

– Recognized by the State of Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources/Department of Wildlife and Forestry for helping to protect the endangered Silversword plant and the Hawaiian Nene Goose

SCHOOL RECOGNITION

-Recognized for computer technology installation on traveling Techno Studio bus which provides mobile computer education for schools in the district

– Participated in State Youth Legislature Conference

– Participated in Hawaii Island Youth Action Summit – 2003 and 2004

– Completed 2 year CISCO (networking and telecommunication) course

EXPERIENCE WITH BARNES BULLETS

David’s first lesson that all bullets are not created equal came when he was seven years old and wasbeing filmed for an ESPN TV show in the South Pacific. He was hunting water buffalo, banteng, rusa and sambar. The guest host of the show got the first chance to shoot each species, then David would follow as his hunt was recorded by the cameras.

When the guest host fired, it would take an average of three shots with a .300 Winchester Magnum to put his animals down. Often a short chase was required after shooting the animal. When David fired his 7mm-08, his animals required only one shot. They either went right down or didn’t go very far.

When he asked how his tiny 7mm-08 cartridge could outperform a .300 Winchester Magnum, he was told it was the effectiveness of the projectile that made the difference. The guest host was a crack shot, but his bullets failed to complete the equation. They were breaking apart on everything from fallow deer to buffalo, and failed to penetrate the animal’s vitals. The guest host thought an accurately placed .300 Winchester Magnum factory bullet should do the job. He was wrong. He lost two buffalo and a fallow deer during the hunt.

After years of using Barnes Bullets, David has learned to trust these bullets to harvest his trophies. He quickly gained confidence that he would be successful if the animal was hit correctly. This confidence carried over in 2004, when he stood his ground to take on a charging cow elephant in Zimbabwe’s Zambezi Valley. When he shot it with a 500-grain Barnes Solid from his .458 Lott, the animal fell dead eight yards from the rifle’s muzzle. He also had confidence in his back-up shooters, who carried a .458 Winchester Magnum and a .470 Nitro Express-both loaded with 500-grain Barnes Solids. If he missed, they would have made sure the elephant did not reach him.

David has used Barnes Bullets in a large number of cartridges to take a wide variety of game. This “on-the-job” experience allowed him to form an educated opinion about Barnes Bullets.

Currently, David uses an ultra lightweight stainless-steel Model 77 Ruger .30-06 loaded with Barnes 180-grain XLC bullets as his all-around rifle. He prefers H4831 powder when loading this round. His medium-bore rifle is a Mark X action in a Brown Precision stock. The rifle is chambered in .416 Taylor and cartridges are loaded with 400-grain Barnes X and Barnes Solid bullets.

His big bore dangerous game rifle is a tricked-out Brno 550 CZ with an MPI stock and muzzle brake. The rifle is chambered for the .458 Lott, which David loads with both 500-grain Barnes X and Solids ahead of IMR 4320 powder.

PERSONAL QUOTE

Barnes bullets give me the confidence to go after big game like elephant and Cape Buffalo with no fear. I have experienced an elephant charge, and witnessed the stopping power of the Barnes Solid and its deep penetration on these big animals. I trust Barnes Bullets to do their job efficiently and effectively. I believe that good shot placement and a Barnes Bullet are the winning combination for a good and successful hunt.

The Barnes X and XLC bullets are great for plains game hunting. The full copper body of the Barnes X and XLC bullets provides the best penetration and weight retention of any expanding bullet. Shooting Barnes X-Bullets, I have had lots of one-shot kills, and no lost animals.

Matthew Y. H. Yap

PERSONAL INFORMATION

Address: Kealakekua, Hawaii

Date of Birth: August 23, 1991 (13 years old)

School: Konawaena Middle School, Grade 8

3.85 GPA

HUNTING INFORMATION

Experience

– Began hunting at age 4

– Hunted in New Zealand, Australia, Namibia, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Argentina, United States, Canada (Matthew had hunted 4 continents by age 9)

– Harvested lion and leopard and darted White Rhino at age 8

– Harvested elephant and Cape Buffalo at age 10

– Achieved recognition as youngest SCI member to achieve the Africa Big Five and Grand Slam of Dangerous Game of Africa Award at age 10

– Hunted with rifle, shotgun, and bow

– Held a State of Hawaii guide license since age 10

– Featured on a Ken Wilson, Sportsman on Film, “The Other Sheep Slam” video

– Featured on the Men’s channel, Outdoor channel and Outdoor Life channel

– Harvested over 80 different species of animals from 4 continents

Awards

– Safari Club International, Young Hunter Award 2005

– SCI World Hunting Awards Program

– Africa Big Five

– Grand Slam of Dangerous Game of Africa

– First Pinnacle of Achievement

– Introduced Trophy Animals of North America – Copper Level

– Global Hunting Award – Bronze Level

– Gazelles of the World – Bronze Level

– Pigs and Peccaries of the World – Bronze Level

– Spiral Horned Antelopes of Africa – Copper Level

– Trophy Animals of South America – Copper Level

– Top Ten Award – Bronze Level

– Trophy Animals of the South Pacific – Diamond Level

– Hunting Achievement Award – Copper Level

– Wild Oxen of the World – Bronze Level

– Wild Sheep of the World-Copper Level

– Front page write-up in West Hawaii Today and Hilo Tribune Herald, and in the sports section of Honolulu Advertiser regarding his hunting accomplishments

CONTRIBUTIONS TO CONSERVATION

– Recognized by the State of Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources/Department of Wildlife and Forestry for helping to protect the endangered Silversword plant and the Hawaiian Nene Goose

SCHOOL RECOGNITION

– Recognized as an Honor Roll Student, 3.85 GPA

– Recognized for his scholarship in Social Studies and English

– Recognized as editor of a video called, “Rolling the Dice” which aired on public television

– Recognized for serving as broadcast anchor, cameraman and audio and video mixer for the middle school’s daily morning bulletin

– Recognized for reading the greatest number of books / pages over the summer by his school

– Recognized for developing the Konawaena Elementary school’s website

EXPERIENCE WITH BARNES BULLETS

At the early age of six, Matthew learned for himself about the substance and merit of Barnes Bullets. During a month-long safari in the South Pacific, Matthew took 21 trophy animals. Sixteen were taken with just one shot. Towards the end of his safari, he ran out of Barnes X-Bullets. He had used up his supply of Barnes X ammo on a couple of cull hunts, and had to use factory ammo to finish the safari.

The rifle he used was a Remington 700 Mountain Rifle with a shortened, custom lightweight MPI stock and a muzzle brake. It was chambered for the 7mm-08 Remington cartridge. With this rifle and Barnes X-Bullets, Matthew easily took large animals like Water Buffalo and Banteng, and extremely tough game like Tahr and Red Stag.

When he was forced to shoot his remaining trophies more than once with factory ammo not loaded with Barnes Bullets, he concluded the factory bullets he bought were nothing but “junk.” He first began blaming his shot placement-but examining the downed animals showed each of the bullets had struck the proven killing spots he’d aimed at. When he later examined the wound channels, which often showed a lack of penetration, Matthew was able to see first-hand the difference in bullet performance. Ever since this experience, Matthew has been adamant that Barnes Bullets be loaded for all his hunts.

Over the years, Matthew has been fortunate enough to participate in the hunting and the culling of hundreds of animals. He has a solid basis to compare the effects of many other brands of bullets regarding their terminal performance on animals. He has shot both large-bodied animals and small game. In his opinion, Barnes Bullets are the best and most assured factor in harvesting trophies and other game, provided the shot is correctly placed. In his words, “You can depend on Barnes bullets to drop your game.”

Matthew’s favorite all-around rifle is a .280 Remington Model 700 Mountain Rifle with a lightweight MPI stock and a muzzle brake. He reloads 160-Grain Barnes X and XLC bullets with IMR 4350 powder for all his hunting. The largest game animal he has taken with this combination is a big Cape Eland bull.

Matthew’s dangerous game rifle is a .375 H&H Magnum MPI stocked Remington 700 with a muzzle brake. This combination weighs just 6 1/2 pounds. He reloads his .375 with 270-grain Barnes XLC bullets and 300-grain Barnes Solids with Winchester 760 powder.

PERSONAL QUOTE

I have found that Barnes X-Bullets have the penetration that is necessary when hunting dangerous game-or any game, for that matter. The caliber of the gun does not make a difference in the ability to kill any better. It is the projectile that counts. Using good shot placement and Barnes X-Bullets, I get good results with smaller calibers. A lot of people have told me you need a big gun to kill elephants and other dangerous game. For me, that did not matter. I had confidence in the Barnes Bullet. I knew the Barnes X-Bullet would penetrate the animal and hit the vitals. Over the years I have hunted, Barnes X-Bullets always did their job, no matter how hard the animal was to kill. I also learned that other bullets did not perform as well as the Barnes X. These other bullets would start to come apart as soon as they hit the animal, and did not provide penetration comparable to that offered by Barnes Bullets.